Helen Lineberry: Notes for an Art History — Part 5

Pictured above on the left is a portrait Helen made of her husband, Albert Lineberry Sr. believed to be made with ink and gouache on paper. On the right is a photograph taken of Helen as new mother in Asheville, NC. By the 1950s, another vector of critical debate is signaled in portraiture: namely, Helen’sContinue reading “Helen Lineberry: Notes for an Art History — Part 5”

Helen Lineberry: Notes for an Art History – Part 4

During World War II, Helen and many other women were suddenly called to the workforce as men served in the U.S. Military. Helen remained in Asheville and went to work as an office clerk in the downtown Grove Arcade, which remains there to this day. An abundance of letters between Helen and Albert now sitContinue reading “Helen Lineberry: Notes for an Art History – Part 4”

Helen Lineberry: Notes for an Art History – Part 2

In high school during the Great Depression, Helen Lineberry (then Helen Howerton) took classes at the WPA art center in Asheville, NC. While we know a great deal in general about the WPA (Works Progress Administration) program established under the Roosevelt, I have yet to find a great deal about this particular art center inContinue reading “Helen Lineberry: Notes for an Art History – Part 2”

Helen Lineberry: Notes for an Art History – Part 1

As you’ll notice in my introductory post, my thesis work incorporates imagery derived from the 1929 drawings created by a 10-year-old Helen Lineberry (then Helen Howerton), who also happened to be my grandmother. These images were incorporated from an ongoing project which sought to aggregate and develop the legacy of Helen Lineberry’s lifetime of artworkContinue reading “Helen Lineberry: Notes for an Art History – Part 1”

“You Got to Move” — Appalachian Folk Schools

Education in the U.S. mountain South has long been a terrain of state neglect. Adopting the “folk school” model from Denmark and other Scandinavian countries for American purposes, ground-up education by and for the people living in so-called Appalachia marks a particular set of contributions toward social and political change. One notable folk school, HighlanderContinue reading ““You Got to Move” — Appalachian Folk Schools”

“Blue Ridge, Lavender Marks” — Revisiting Warhol’s Photographs in the Turchin Center’s Permanent Collection

Introduction

Hi there! Welcome to the inaugural post of my blog ❤ Blogs may seem retrograde but I think that makes it the perfect amount of pressure. One can also stretch their legs a bit more. I just finished my MFA in May and am eager to share what I’m making and processing. Some of myContinue reading “Introduction”